Sore throat and acid reflux: Causes and treatment


Posted On Jun 17 2017 by

People with GERD experience chronic, persistent reflux that occurs at least twice a week. Tilting the head of your bed upward will raise your head, which can help reduce the chance that your stomach acid will reflux into your throat during the night. The Cleveland Clinic recommends using bed risers. These are small, column-like platforms placed under the legs of your bed. People often use them to make room for storage.

Endoscopy will also identify several of the complications of GERD, specifically, ulcers, strictures, and Barrett’s esophagus. Biopsies also may be obtained.

And, if you do reflux, gravity is able to quickly return the contents to your stomach. Whew. This ideal sleep position provides a double whammy of decreasing your GERD symptoms and providing protection from prolonged acid exposure to your esophagus, throat, lungs, and sinuses. People spend approximately one-third of their lives sleeping. Nighttime reflux is particularly dangerous because stomach acid may come into contact with the esophagus for many hours at night while sleeping, damaging and eroding the tissue.

But the esophageal lining usually is not inflamed. It is possible therefore, that the acid is stimulating the pain nerves within the esophageal wall just beneath the lining. Although this may be the case, a second explanation is supported by the work of one group of scientists.

If there is not a satisfactory response to this maximal treatment, 24 hour pH testing should be done. There are several possible results of endoscopy and each requires a different approach to treatment. If the esophagus is normal and no other diseases are found, the goal of treatment simply is to relieve symptoms.

To prevent a major case of acid reflux at night, Huber recommends eating a heavier lunch and a lighter dinner. (And think about skipping the sugar before bed, since it also interferes with sleep.) I’ve started to spend a few hours on Sunday meal prep so that I can get more substantial lunches ready for the week. estimate that GERD is responsible for over 25 percent of all cases of chronic cough. The majority of people with a GERD-induced cough don’t have classic symptoms of the disease such as heartburn.

Babies are more likely to have a weak LES. This makes the LES relax when it should stay shut. As food or milk is digesting, the LES opens. It lets the stomach contents go back up to the esophagus.

It’s also important to be honest about any problems you have with sleep (diagnosed or not) or about any of the silent symptoms listed above. Reflux, for instance, could be the reason you have problems with insomnia. To learn more about the relationship between reflux and all sleep disorders, check out this article published by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

  • A majority of patients with GERD have hiatal hernias, but many do not.
  • Acid and sometimes food appear in the throat and there is severe burning.
  • Likewise, because nighttime GERD is a more aggressive form of the disease, a clinician may be more likely to perform an endoscopy on a patient in whom significant nighttime heartburn is suspected.
  • These electrolytes promote pH balance in the body, which is crucial for controlling acid reflux.

Examples of H2 blockers include ranitidine (Zantac), cimetidine (Tagamet), nizatidine (Axid), and famotidine (Pepcid). The types of food you eat may cause digestive discomfort. If you are prone to acid reflux, avoid eating spicy foods, acidic foods, and other foods that trigger reflux because they relax the LES. Known trigger foods include tomatoes, garlic, citrus fruits, onions, chocolate, peppermint, and fatty foods. Avoiding drinking alcohol.

Heartburn or acid indigestion is the most common symptom of GERD. Always check with your baby’s provider before raising the head of the crib if he or she has been diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux. This is for safety reasons and to reduce the risk for SIDS and other sleep-related infant deaths. Treatment will depend on your child’s symptoms, age, and general health.

Don’t sleep on your right side. For some reason, this seems to prompt relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter – the tight ring of muscle connecting the stomach and esophagus that normally defends against reflux.

For the acid perfusion test, a thin tube is passed through one nostril, down the back of the throat, and into the middle of the esophagus. A dilute, acid solution and a physiologic salt solution (similar to the fluid that bathes the body’s cells) are alternately poured (perfused) through the catheter and into the esophagus. The patient is unaware of which solution is being infused. If the perfusion with acid provokes the patient’s usual pain and perfusion of the salt solution produces no pain, it is likely that the patient’s pain is caused by acid reflux.

Experiencing acid reflux during the day is bad enough, but at night it’s even worse. The feeling of choking on acid while you’re trying to sleep is horrible. It can make it difficult to fall asleep, and you’re more likely to wake up suddenly during the night.

Pregnant women should not eat fried food or spicy foods. Pregnant ladies should not lie down immediately after eating.

GERD is the 3rd most common gastrointestinal disorder in the U.S. Most patients with GERD also experience nighttime heartburn, which is more bothersome. And according to the 2001 NSF Sleep in America poll, adults in America who experience nighttime heartburn are more likely to report having symptoms of sleep problems/disorders such as insomnia, sleep apnea, daytime sleepiness and restless legs syndrome than those who don’t have nighttime heartburn. If you have acid reflux or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), you may spend mealtimes avoiding certain foods and drinks. These conditions cause stomach acid to leak back into the esophagus.

waking up coughing acid reflux

Last Updated on: September 25th, 2019 at 11:38 am, by


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