Natural Heartburn Remedies During Pregnancy


Posted On Mar 4 2015 by

5 ways to beat pregnancy indigestion

But it may not work for everyone as some women may find that dairy products make their symptoms worse. Indigestion is one of the most common complaints during pregnancy with 80% of women experiencing it at some point. Antacids help to neutralise stomach acids, while alginates work by forming a protective coating over the walls of your stomach and gullet.

If you are pregnant, it can also put your unborn baby at risk of developing serious birth defects. If you have indigestion (dyspepsia) while you are pregnant, you may not need medicine to control your symptoms. Antacids are a type of medicine that can provide immediate relief from indigestion.

Sit up straight when you eat. This will take the pressure off your stomach. Propping your head and shoulders up when you go to bed can stop stomach acid coming up while you sleep. First, your doctor will try to rule out other health conditions that could be causing your symptoms. She might do blood tests and X-rays of your stomach or small intestine.

The stomach acid breaks down the mucosa, which causes irritation and leads to the symptoms of indigestion. If you are pregnant and you have indigestion (dyspepsia), your symptoms will be the same as those of anyone else with the condition. When you have heartburn, or acid reflux, the LES relaxes enough to allow stomach acid to rise up into the esophagus. This can cause pain and burning in the chest area. Lillis, Charlotte.

You probably won’t be able to get through your entire pregnancy without a little heartburn. But, while it may be annoying, leave you with a bad taste in your mouth, or disrupt your sleep, it’s usually not harmful. You can try your best to prevent it, and then take steps to cope with it when it pops up.

Indigestion is the condition, and heartburn occasionally is a symptom of indigestion. The condition is also known as dyspepsia or upset stomach. Many women have indigestion during the middle and later parts of pregnancy.

As a result, the muscles of the stomach and oesophagus (the tube leading from the mouth to the stomach) relax. This allows digestive acids, which normally stay in your stomach, to go backwards, up into your oesophagus and mouth. The acids give you a burning feeling in your throat (though it’s called heartburn, it has nothing to do with your heart).

If you have severe indigestion or changes to your diet haven’t helped, ask your GP, midwife or pharmacist for advice on medicines that are safe to take during pregnancy and right for your symptoms. If you have indigestion at night, try to eat your dinner at least three hours before you go to bed. During pregnancy, do not use antacids that have sodium bicarbonate (such as baking soda), because they can cause fluid buildup. Do not use antacids that have magnesium trisilicate, because they may not be safe for your baby. It is okay to use antacids that have calcium carbonate (such as Tums).

This weakness resolves after delivery. Medications that may be safe for pregnant women to relieve heartburn include antacids, alginic acid/antacid combinations, and sucralfate. Antacids may interfere with iron absorption, and iron is important for the growing fetus so pregnant women may need iron supplementation. You are more likely to get indigestion if you are very full, so regularly eating large amounts of food may make your symptoms worse.

Don’t rule out whole classes of healthy foods, however, as beans and cruciferous vegetables are very nutritious. Instead, keep track of your body’s reactions to different foods — meals that give your friend indigestion may sit just fine with you — and avoid foods that cause you problems. Both heartburn and indigestion are common conditions during pregnancy and rarely require medical attention. Heartburn — which actually has nothing to do with your heart — is marked by a burning sensation after meals in your throat or in your chest behind the breastbone. It’s caused by stomach acid coming in contact with the esophagus (the pipe your food travels down).

Additionally, as the weeks go on and your belly gets bigger, your expanding uterus and growing baby begin to put pressure on your stomach. This pressure can push the contents of the stomach past the weakened sphincter and up into the esophagus, also leading to heartburn. Progesterone causes the stomach to empty more slowly after you eat while relaxin calms or relaxes the smooth muscle in your body. The ring, or sphincter, around the bottom of the esophagus that keeps the food and stomach acid in your stomach, is made up of smooth muscle. It may burn, but it doesn’t have anything to do with your heart.

It may be necessary to alternate magnesium and aluminum-containing antacids to avoid diarrhea or constipation. If antacids alone are not effective, then they should be continued and alginic acid/antacid may be added. Antacids and alginic acid/antacid should be taken after meals and at bedtime, more frequently if necessary, as advised by your doctor.

Last Updated on: September 27th, 2019 at 1:38 am, by


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