Golden Retriever with Acid Reflux


Posted On Oct 21 2009 by

For diagnostic purposes, your vet will likely perform an esophagoscopy, which allows her to examine the condition of your dog’s esophagus. Luckily, treatment is easy. Your vet my recommend that you fast your pup for a day or two, and then transition to a strict diet of small, frequent meals.

Irvine Compounding Pharmacy recommends a treatment called Cisapride, which is a medication for dogs and cats. For Acid Reflux, Cisapride can help with the regulation of motility, or regular pace of muscular contractions that control the passing of food in the stomach, allowing for better digestion, and a decrease in excess acid generation. Barring anything unusual, such as a hernia, or a foreign body lodged in the stomach, intestines, or elsewhere, the Cisapride treatment can be very effective, and is often complimented with an adjusted diet. Invariably, a low fat, low protein diet is recommended. Reducing the fat consumption encourages the strengthening of the sphincter, while reducing the protein limits the generation of excess stomach acid.

Also, changing the time of the day that your canine eats might help as well. The presence of Acid Reflux in our pets can very elusive to recognize. Imagining a cat encountering a hairball, or a dog having issues with digesting a bone are much easier than conceiving of more complicated problems. Let’s remember to let the qualified professionals do the official diagnosing, while we stick to adding the love and devotion in exchange for the purring and wagging tails. Certain breeds of dogs and cats can have a genetic predisposition to Acid Reflux.

What Causes Acid Reflux in Dogs?

how many dogs get acid reflux

There are several reasons why a dog might develop gastroesophageal reflux and other hyperacidity syndromes with the main one being when the muscle opening at the base of their oesophagus is weakened or damaged in any way. Jake has been checked out by his vet, x rays and blood work and our vet recommended we change his main protein in his food. We were feeding Jake a high quality no grain for sensitive stomachs, but main ingredient was chicken. We purchased 4 days ago limited ingredient Bison and sweet potato.

poodle mix. It seems like at least once a month he vomits yellow stomach acid 2-4 times and always between 3-4am. He also has runny stool. This lasts for about a week, then bowl movements return to normal.

What is going on? Do we have a ulcer issue, bacterial issue, lemon dog? Do I have a need to get this dog a 1 over and figure this out?

Most veterinarians will recommend changing your dog’s diet to boiled chicken, rice, and/or blanched broccoli in order to sufficiently reduce the acid reflux. These meals should be given in small amounts throughout the day. The cost of these items will vary depending on your local grocery store prices. However, it would be wise to plan for a minimum of $20 per meal. If your veterinarian allows you to continue feeding normal kibble, adding water to make a “cereal” would make things easier.

After all, there’s probably more ways to spoil him than just a steak bone… even if he disagrees. It’s common across all dogs, but especially likely to impact younger dogs, since their “bay door” muscles are less fully developed. Acid reflux is most common after your pup has eaten a high-fat meal or after your dog has eaten too much and her stomach is totally full.

  • The presence of Acid Reflux in our pets can very elusive to recognize.
  • Talk to your vet first to see what he or she recommends.
  • Smaller meals will also reduce the chances of a dog developing a dangerous condition known as bloat, or volvulus.
  • Any dog can potentially develop acid reflux.
  • I would recommend chatting with your vet about it and trying a few out.
  • When they eat any sort of dairy product or fermentable fiber like oat bran, burping and flatulence will usually occur.

The dog’s behavioral history can reveal symptoms such as spitting up (regurgitation) of food, evidence of pain (whining or howling, for example) while swallowing, lack of appetite, and weight loss. A physical exam will often not reveal any concrete findings.

Gastroesophageal reflux disease – also known as GERD, reflux esophagitis, or acid reflux – is a condition in which there is an uncontrolled backflow of gastric or intestinal fluids into the esophagus, which is the tube that connects the throat to the stomach. Gastrointestinal fluids – which include stomach acid, pepsin, bile, and other components – can damage the mucosal lining of the esophagus and cause inflammation, a condition called esophagitis. There are several ways that you can help your dog suffering from acid reflux to feel better. These include dietary control, gastroprotective drugs (drugs that form a protective bandage over inflamed tissue), prokinetics, and antacid medications (drugs that decrease stomach acid production).

This is also known as GastroGard or Prilosec. It is a prescription medication. It is a proton pump inhibitor and prevents acid production both in the simulated stomach (when there is food to digest) or resting state (an empty tummy). Feed your dog four small meals a day.

how many dogs get acid reflux

Any idea what this would be? My sister says it may be acid reflux but he doesn’t gag or throw up.

This one is dangerous because it can cause vomit to enter the dog’s lungs that can lead to further damage. Caused if your dog has been administered anesthesia. Either from failure to fast your dog properly prior to anesthesia or from improper positioning of your dog during anesthesia. It can cause the esophageal sphincter to relax, which leaves an opening between the stomach and the esophagus.

He will be 15 on September. Who can resist spoiling your dog every now and then? Sometimes, you finish your dinner and Noodle has been a particularly good boy, so you just can’t help but treat him to something… extra. Unfortunately, sometimes you end up with more than just a fat and happy pup.

Share any methods that have worked for your dog with acid reflux. You can follow justforyourdog.com on Pinterest, FaceBook and Twitter. Obesity.

Last Updated on: September 26th, 2019 at 4:07 pm, by


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