Feeling the burn? Tips to manage heartburn, GERD in pregnancy


Posted On Mar 13 2015 by

See the Health A-Z topic about antacids for more information about this type of medicine. The stomach acid breaks down the mucosa, which causes irritation and leads to the symptoms of indigestion. The symptoms of indigestion (dyspepsia) are caused by stomach acid coming into contact with the sensitive, protective lining (mucosa) of your digestive system. You may experience indigestion at any point during your pregnancy, although your symptoms may be more frequent and severe during your third trimester (from week 27 until the birth of the baby).

Risk factors for PUD in pregnancy include smoking, alcoholism, stress, socioeconomic status, and a previous history of PUD or Helicobacter pylori gastritis. Nonsteroidal medications are not a common risk factor for PUD in pregnancy unless in combination with colonization with H pylori. Cholecystectomy is indicated in the presence of persistent or recurrent symptoms, significant nutritional compromise, and weight loss.

Pregnant women with GERD present similarly to individuals in the general population; heartburn and regurgitation are the cardinal symptoms. The clinical evaluation consists of a thorough patient history and physical examination; diagnostic studies are rarely needed. Endoscopy may be indicated in patients with complications of GERD, and 24-hour ambulatory pH studies can be useful in those with atypical presentations (eg, cough, wheezing, sore throat) and refractory symptoms. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), generally known as heartburn, is common in pregnancy and can have a negative impact on their healt-realted quality of life, particularly late in pregnancy. Gastrointestinal (GI) disorders represent some of the most frequent complaints during pregnancy, possibly due in part to elevated levels of progesterone (eg, nausea/vomiting, gastroesophagel reflux disease [GERD]) and/or prostaglandins (diarrhea).

Advance cites data from clinical studies (including more than 500 pregnant women) and post-marketing experience which does not show fetal toxicity or malformations [ABPI Medicines Compendium, 2014]. This recommendation is pragmatic and is based on what CKS considers to be good clinical practice. Although dyspepsia in pregnancy is a common symptom, other treatments are available if symptoms are not controlled by self-care and lifestyle measures.

Some antacids are combined with another type of medicine known as an alginate. This helps to relieve indigestion caused by acid reflux. Acid reflux occurs when stomach acid leaks back up into your oesophagus (gullet) and irritates its protective lining (mucosa). Most people are affected by indigestion from time to time, but women are often affected by it while they are pregnant. As many as 8 out of 10 women experience indigestion at some point during their pregnancy.

treatment for gerd in pregnancy

Pregnant? Don’t Eat ThisDo you know which common foods may be risky during pregnancy? Learn which foods to avoid, while pregnant, such as queso dip, lunch meat, coffee and more. Signs and symptoms that you may have only if you are pregnant include, implantation cramping and bleeding, a white, milky vaginal discharge, and your areolas or nipples darken. The only way to find out if you are pregnant is with a pregnancy test.

Avoid digestive overload. Skip the three big squares.

The LINX device is an expandable ring of metal beads that keeps stomach acid from refluxing into the esophagus, but allows food to pass into the stomach. Certain foods can be very harmful for pregnant women and their babies. This is a list of 11 foods and drinks that pregnant women should avoid. If you have heartburn that often wakes you up at night, returns as soon as your antacid wears off, or creates other symptoms (such as difficulty swallowing, coughing, weight loss, or black stools), you may have a more serious problem that requires attention. Your doctor may diagnose you with GERD.

LBG In my practice, I encounter women who are contemplating pregnancy more commonly than women who are already pregnant; once women become pregnant, their obstetricians usually take over management, including management of GERD symptoms. The issue of whether PPI therapy should be discontinued is a common topic of conversation with my GERD patients who are contemplating pregnancy. In these patients, I usually recommend temporary cessation of PPI therapy during conception and pregnancy, if tolerated, but I also explain that the usage of these agents has been demonstrated to be safe and, therefore, they should be used if needed.

treatment for gerd in pregnancy

Last Updated on: September 27th, 2019 at 1:52 am, by


Written by admin


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *