Caring for Kids With GERD


Posted On Jun 1 2017 by

Medications are not recommended for children with uncomplicated reflux. Reflux medications can have complications, such as preventing absorption of iron and calcium in infants and increasing the likelihood of developing particular respiratory and intestinal infections. Keeping infants upright for at least 30 minutes following feeds and elevating crib and diaper-changing tables by 30 degrees may also help prevent symptoms of reflux.

While rare, studies may be necessary either to establish/support the diagnosis of GERD or to determine the extent of damage caused by the repeated reflux events. Gastroesophogeal reflux is different from vomiting because usually it is not associated with a violent ejection. Moreover, GER is generally a singular event in time, whereas the vomiting process is commonly several back-to-back events that may ultimately completely empty all stomach contents and yet still persist (“dry heaves”). The difference between GER and GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease) is a matter of severity and associated consequences to the patient.

What’s the Connection Between Anxiety and Acid Reflux?

Always check with your baby’s provider before raising the head of the crib if he or she has been diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux. Place all babies, including babies with GERD, on their backs for all sleeping until they are 1-year-old. This is for safety reasons and to reduce the risk for SIDS and other sleep-related infant deaths. GERD, or gastroesophageal reflux disease, is a long-term (chronic) digestive disorder. It happens when stomach contents flow back up (reflux) into the food pipe (esophagus) and cause symptoms or problems.

Treating GER

Each was checked for acid reflux, but only one had it. In fact, studies now show that even babies who do have severe reflux usually have no pain.

Breastfed babies may benefit from a change in the mother’s diet. Some studies have shown that babies benefit when mom restricts her intake of milk and eggs. Formula-fed infants may be helped by a change in formula. Most babies spit up sometimes, even several times a day. But when vomiting causes other problems or comes with other symptoms, it may be due to acid reflux, also called gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

Lifestyle changes and simple home care are typically the best place to start. He might also prescribe a medicine to help your child’s stomach make less acid.

What causes reflux?

For younger babies, try a small amount of thickened milk at the beginning of a feed. Many bottle-fed babies find relief from reflux when thickened formula is used. In most cases, a doctor diagnoses reflux by reviewing your baby’s symptoms and medical history. If the symptoms do not get better with feeding changes and anti-reflux medicines, your baby may need testing.

You should consult your pediatrician prior to trying cereal in the bottle as it is a dangerous practice and recommended only in severe instances. To help reduce the likelihood of reflux, try feeding your baby a smaller quantity of breast milk or formula, but more frequently than usual.

It is very important to talk with your infant’s doctor before undertaking any changes in sleeping positions. If reflux continues after your child’s first birthday, or if your child is having symptoms such as lack of weight gain and breathing problems, you might be referred to a doctor who specializes in children’s digestive diseases (pediatric gastroenterologist). Medications that might be prescribed include H2 blockers and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). These medications ease symptoms of GERD by lowering acid production in the stomach and can help heal the lining of the food pipe.

Last Updated on: September 25th, 2019 at 11:37 am, by


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